What I Read in September (2020)

Books Read in September: 28

Books Read for the Year: 244/200

Topical Books/Monthly Goal Books: 

Mansfield Park, by Jane Austen (classic). Loved it. Again.

Real Love in an Angry World, by Rick Bezet (spiritual). I think I need to read this again every week, considering the state of the world.

No Place Like Here, by Christina June (TBR). I’ve enjoyed Christina June’s books, and I love how they’re linked.

The Yada Yada Prayer Group Gets Down, by Neta Jackson (TBR).

A Voice in the Wind, by Francine Rivers (TBR). This was a re-read, but I don’t remember it, so it was like the first time reading it again. Wonderful book!

For Review:

The Secret French Recipes of Sophie Valroux, by Samantha Verant. I thoroughly enjoyed this book…and the food descriptions were to-die-for.

All Stirred Up, by Brianne Moore. Another food-related read! I liked this, but many of the characters were obsessed with appearances/social media, and her family basically sucked, but it was still a pleasant read.

Little Bookshop of Murder, by Maggie Blackburn. I enjoy a good cozy mystery and the beach town/book store setting should have been a winner, but I found the main character annoying and whiny, and the secondary characters were enough alike to be confusing.

The Orphan of Cemetery Hill, by Hester Fox. This is another solid read by Fox. A bit creepy and atmospheric and it ended up being an engrossing read.

Chance of a Lifetime, by Jude Deveraux. This was just “meh” to me.

In Case You Missed It, by Lindsey Kelk. I loved the friend group and the mom’s wardrobe malfunctions, but the MC just kept doing stupid stuff and being whiny and annoying.

Anxious People, by Fredrik Backman. I have LOVED everything I’ve read of Backman’s, and this was no exception. As always, his prose is the shining star that had me in stitches.

Broken, by John Rector. This just didn’t work for me. I’m not much for predictable “thrillers” or unlikable characters.

Smash It, by Francina Simone. This is billed as a re-telling of Othello, but…just because the MC is in the school musical of Othello doesn’t make it a re-telling. At all. And the MC was one of the most selfish and self-absorbed characters I’ve ever read, so no.

Don’t Look for Me, by Wendy Walker. This was an interesting thriller. I wasn’t too attached to any of the characters, but it was different enough from the norm that I didn’t get bored.

The Left-Handed Booksellers of London, by Garth Nix. This was a quirky, fun, intriguing read that I thoroughly enjoyed.

The Silvered Serpents, by Roshani Chokshi. This was a great read. I probably should have read the first book first, but it was still very enjoyable.

Knight in Paper Armor, by Nicholas Conley. This near-future dystopian was a bit depressing—but believable—and I enjoyed the read.

Misleading a Duke, by A.S. Fenichel. I enjoyed this second book in a series about a group of friends who aren’t the typical socialites in their society. This one has spies, being held captive/hostage, and of course, romance.

A Heartfelt Christmas Promise by Nancy Naigle. This book, thankfully, did not have the typical city-girl-come-to-the-country feel, as the MC wasn’t condescending and better than everyone. Instead, she listened to what people were telling her and tried to do the best thing for the town. I liked this sweet, small-town read.

The Code for Love and Heartbreak, by Jillian Canor (review forthcoming). This was an amusing re-telling of Emma, and man, is Emma bad with people. It made me laugh, but also feel sorry for her. I thought this was a great retelling!

Just Because: (Yes, I’m aware of the theme going on here. It is what it is.)

Apollyon by Tim LeHaye.

Assassins, by Tim LeHaye.

Revelation 1-222 Commentary, by John McArthur.

The Indwelling, by Tim LeHaye.

Desecration, by Tim LeHaye.

Revelation: The Christian’s Ultimate Victory, by John MacArthur.

Left Unfinished:

Daughters of the Wild, by Natalka Burian. I made it about 10%, but this just wasn’t for me.

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