Book Review:  After the Plague, by Imogen Keeper

Image belongs to Mindless Muse Publishing.

Title After the Plague
Author:   Imogen Keeper
Genre:   Romance, fantasy
Rating:  4 out of 5

99% of the population dies due to a strange unnatural virus, leaving 1% grieving, scared, desperate, capable of anything, plunged into a world without laws, and no one to enforce them anyway.

 Frankie has zero skills to survive, but when she loses the love of her life, she discovers an untapped well of hope and courage inside herself – to find the others, the left-behind survivors who must now rebuild in the face of gathering clans, rising dictators, and everpresent danger.

 When Yorke, a lone soldier, who never wanted a family, finds Frankie, he has a single burning conviction: if anyone will make the rules in this strange new lawless world, it will be them.

 Before the apocalypse they were strangers. Now their lives will forever be entwined.

I read all three of these stories—Broken, Lost, and Found—pretty quickly. I enjoyed both Frankie’s and Yorke’s points-of-view, as well as the characters themselves. This was an interesting dystopian viewpoint, too:  far enough in the future to change daily life (like the prevalence of solar-powered homes so the characters can find one to stay in pretty easily), but not so different that the reader doesn’t feel completely at home. I’m also intrigued by what the red-haired woman who has taken over the White House is up to, so I’ll likely read the fourth volume in this series, Safe, very soon.

Imogen Keeper lives outside of Washington, D.C. After the Plague is her dystopian saga.

(Galley courtesy of Mindless Muse Publishing in exchange for an honest review.)

 

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